[OVC-demo-team] Re: RII

From: Cory Hamma <evm_at_wabbiter_dot_com>
Date: Tue Mar 30 2004 - 17:42:32 CST

Hi All,

So just to make this clear, here are the steps as I see them:

1. Voter takes ballot from printer and places it into the privacy folder.
2. Voter takes privacy folder to a "verification station" AKA "ballot
check station" to have the contents of the ballot read back to them.
**OPTIONAL**
3.Voter takes privacy folder to ballot box.

Note that you do NOT want to have the voter folding the piece of paper
in half to make it easier to slip into the privacy folder.

It would be helpful if someone could tell me the name of this station
where the ballot is read back to the user ... or if there is no official
name, simple suggestions are welcome. (Ballot Verification Station is
not a simple suggestion)

-Cory

Jan Karrman wrote:

>On Mon, 29 Mar 2004, Cory Hamma wrote:
>
>
>
>>Hi Jan,
>>
>>I believe this whole printing.wav has gotten way too complicated.
>>As I understand it, the purpose of "verifying" that the ballot has correctly printed is just to make sure the bar code is visible from inside the privacy folder, and that the bar code was printed correctly.
>>
>>Currently, it makes it sound like there is some sort of procedure that must be done to verify that the ballot has printed correctly, when all that the voter (or pollworker) must do is glance to see that a bar code has been printed.
>>
>>Either the voter is visually impaired, or their understanding of computers is such that the audible interface is the easiest for them to understand. (I'm imagining a phone system)
>>
>>First, we aren't telling them what to "check" about their ballot. If the person is not familiar with computers, they may not be familiar with bar codes. If the person is visually impaired, they may not see well enough to tell whether something has printed properly or whether the printer is broken. So we obviously need to leave this up to a pollworker, who has seen a properly completed ballot and knows what the bar code looks like when it has printed correctly.
>>
>>I'm hoping what I have written below sounds good. At all the voting stations I have been to, there are always pollworkers by the ballot box. Asking a visually impaired person to find a pollworker and then the ballot box is redundant. Besides, assuming the pollworkers are nice, one of them will escort the visually impaired person to the ballot box.
>>
>>Printing.wav:
>>Your ballot is printing. When it has finished printing, place it in the privacy folder. Do this before you leave the voting booth. (pause)
>>After you have placed your ballot in the privacy folder, take it to the ballot box and ask a pollworker to verify that your ballot was printed correctly. This can be done without removing the ballot from the privacy folder. Then deposit your ballot in the ballot box. Thank you for voting. Please remove the headphones now.
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>No, it is not the pollworker that should verify the ballot - it is
>the voter herself. This is done at a special barcode scanning station
>with headphones that reads the votes. No familiarity with bar codes
>whatsoever is needed. The ballot is simply entered in some device that
>scans the barcode. But it is this part that the voter probably will
>need assistance with. And it is of course important that the folder
>covers everything but the barcode.
>
>
>
>
>
>>Please feel free to forward this message onto the mailing list or whomever -- this is a big deal because Alan wants to make it clear that the blind voter can now verify their own voting choices for the first time now.
>>
>>-Cory
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>/Jan
>
>
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Received on Thu Apr 1 02:40:35 2004

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