Re: More on voting stations

From: <dr-jekyll_at_att_dot_net>
Date: Tue May 11 2004 - 21:48:25 CDT

Any idea how much it would cost to buy used voting equipment from San Diego County?

Kurt

attached mail follows:


RE: [voting-project] More on voting stationsHello Helen:

    I'm certainly not Alan but I'll take a run at it as I've been researching the question. Dell is retailing a PC with monitor for under $500. <http://www1.us.dell.com/content/products/features.aspx/advertised_dimen?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs>. On the same page it shows a printer for around $80 that would be more than adequate. San Diego County needs to replace 11,000 decertified Diebold voting machines so chances are that they could get a very nice volume discount. Other areas could certainly do the same. I'm not necessarily promoting Dell, I'm just familiar with them. Software is a question as it hasn't been written yet except as a demonstration version so let's pluck a number out of the air. I'll say $300/license for lack of anything better. So, you've got perhaps $800 in hardware and software. It's been clarified that the actual voting stations could be built out of cardboard or foam core and placed on rented folding banquet tables. We've got UPS (uninterruptible power supplies) and that rounds out the hardware except for a bar code reader or two and perhaps a scanner. Add $200/machine for this support hardware.

Then there's the cost of training, setting up the ballot and roving technicians during election day. But you know, that's the same cost that the DRE's have so for the sake of comparison we can say all things are equal. There's probably a good bit that I've forgotten or haven't thought about so let's mark the $1000 subtotal up 50% to cover margins. as well. Each voting station would be $1,500 delivered, setup and ready to go. This compares quite nicely with the $3,000 per machine a typical Diebold machine costs. Here's the best part. Once you're done with the election, you can use the machines for most anything else a PC is used for. Or, you can even sell them. You certainly can't do that with a dedicated electronic voting machine. Let's say that each machine could net $250 each and you've got a life cycle cost of under $1,250 each. Just a reminder, I used the retail prices of the computer so one could even assume that it might be $1,000 per machine.

Hope this helps.

Thanks, Ed Kennedy

----- Original Message -----
  From: Ellen Theisen
  To: voting-project@lists.sonic.net
  Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 2004 6:34 PM
  Subject: Re: [voting-project] More on voting stations

  Alan,

  I'm reviewing the costs for an OCV system, and I think I got something wrong. Is this true, that each computer must have its own printer? If so, what are you estimating to be the printer costs?

  I don't need something exact, just a close estimate -- but as soon as you can.

  Thanks,

  Ellen Theisen
  www.votersunite.org
  Join with us! Sign up at http://www.votersunite.org/signup.asp
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Received on Mon May 31 23:17:36 2004

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