Re: Voting Stations

From: Ed Kennedy <ekennedyx_at_yahoo_dot_com>
Date: Thu May 06 2004 - 20:19:47 CDT

Hello Doug:

    We must be talking about different Diebold machines. The one I used on
Super Tuesday here in San Diego County had a more or less vertical screen
with a card reader in the bezel on the upper right. I'm not sure how that
is connected with mostly horizontal screens. Any ideas?

Thanks, Ed Kennedy

----- Original Message -----
From: "Douglas W. Jones" <jones@cs.uiowa.edu>
To: <voting-project@lists.sonic.net>
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2004 2:22 PM
Subject: Re: [voting-project] Voting Stations

>
> On May 6, 2004, at 3:58 PM, Edmund R. Kennedy wrote:
>
> > Hello Alan:
> >
> > Actually I read that note but I didn't see the
> > drawing. I'm a little concerned about glare. I don't
> > know about your polling places but mine is in the
> > garage of one of my neighbors.
>
> Several voting machines have screens that are close to
> flat on the table, including the Fidlar Doubleday
> Electrovote DRE and the original Global AccuTouch
> DRE (from which the current generation of Diebold
> machines descend). This offers considerably more
> voter privacy than the ones with screens that are near
> vertical.
>
> > Also, the kiosks in my
> > branch library are pretty hefty items so that might
> > not be the best model if you're looking for light
> > weight.
>
> Here is the lightest weight and most portable voting
> booth I know of, used fairly widely for ES&S, Diebold and
> Fidlar-Doubleday DRE machines, as well as being used for
> optical mark-sense voting:
>
> http://www.toteavote.com/ Tote-a-Vote
>
> > Now that I've through about it for a little
> > while, I'm dropping the requirement for a curtain
> > except for booths made for the wheel chair bound.
>
> Curtains are unnecessary if the flat screen monitor
> faces up, even when the voter is in a wheelchair.
> It's when the monitor faces out that you need a
> curtain.
>
> > I
> > hate to make a 'special' booth for the disabled on
> > general principles of mainlining but that's my
> > problem. It still might be good to have 6-12" 'wings'
> > sticking out on each side of a booth for privacy.
>
> There are some inexpensive wheelchair accessible booths
> on the market that are almost as crummy (sorry,
> economical) as the Tote-A-Vote. They're designed so
> you can pull a wheelchair right under the table and
> work on the tablet-style screen in front of you.
> I've tested them while riding a wheelchair and
> severely limiting my arm motion. They work.
>
> > Also, on a related note, I was just looking at
> > ink jet printers when I realized that one of the
> > challenges was that they only hold about 200 or so
> > sheets of paper at a time. At full capacity at the
> > polling place, how many people an hour would use an
> > EVM?
>
> Typically, you'll have about 100 voters per voting
> booth -- the Tote-A-Vote recommendation calls for
> this, and it's typical of what I've seen in real
> precincts, where on a day when they expect 400 voters
> to turn out per precinct, they set up 4 booths.
>
> It takes 15 minutes to read through an entire
> general election ballot, out loud, at a measured
> pace. You usually give each voter 5 minutes, so
> the booth can handle 12 voters per hour. Polls
> are open from 6 AM to 9 PM (at least, those are
> the hours we keep in Iowa), so in a day, about the
> largest number of voters you could handle per
> booth is 180.
>
> > In other words, if a vendor decided to use ink
> > jet printers how many times a day might each printer
> > have to be refilled with paper? Similarly, a laser
> > printer usually holds 500 sheets.
> >
> > I found the Australian site pretty interesting.
> > However I noticed that that they were using a LAN, a
> > server and perhaps only one printer. I didn't think
> > we were doing that. I get the impression that there
> > was an actual internal structure that was holding the
> > cardboard up. The problem of dealing with weight and
> > security seals doesn't come up or at least isn't
> > discussed in the site you've mentioned. I know that
> > the actual booth could be handled with cardboard
> > cylinders and such but I think a 'normal' pc cpu would
> > need to sit on the floor.
> >
> > I also may the wrong idea of what sort of 'enclosure'
> > is needed. I guess something as simple as a piece
> > fitted foam core would deter many people. The cpu
> > would sit sideways and to the rear under the booth. A
> > simple piece of foam core then would cover it over so
> > it would be out of site and more or less out of mind.
> > However, I recall that when my son was younger and I
> > took him to the polls with me, he liked to play under
> > things---like the voting booths. I'm still concerned
> > with vandalism and sabotage but perhaps I'm
> > hyperventilating. I guess it could be put down on the
> > list of things to study.
> >
> > What do you think?
> >
> > Thanks, Ed Kennedy
> >
> > --- Alan Dechert <alan@openvotingconsortium.org>
> > wrote:
> >> Ed,
> >>
> >> Please review this post and followups.
> >>
> >>
> > http://gnosis.python-hosting.com/voting-project/April.2004/0117.html
> >>
> >> I made a [crummy] sketch of my idea for that.
> >>
> >> You might also have a look at what the Aussies did.
> >> This is ALL
> >> cardboard--encloses CPU, CRT etc--no printer.
> >>
> >> http://www.softimp.com.au/evacs2.html
> >>
> >> We have to design something really cheap,
> >> functional, portable, and
> >> storable. The table design I have is something that
> >> could work for
> >> non-voting PC applications like libraries, kiosks,
> >> etc.
> >>
> >> Alan D.
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > =====
> > 10777 Bendigo Cove
> > San Diego, CA 92126-2510
> >
> > Amendment 1 to the US Constitution
> >
> > "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion,
> > or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of
> > speech, or of the press; or the right of people peaceably to assemble,
> > and to petition the government for the redress of grievances."
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Received on Mon May 31 23:17:20 2004

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